This presentedesentation will demonstrate how to take advantage of the automatic Range Interval Partitioning and Rolling Windows to fragment your huge Informix tables. Automatically adding new partitions and fragments by interval can replace elaborate fragmentation schemes easily. The feature includes the ability to automatically drop partitions of old data reducing the need to purge old data.


This webcast will focus on best practices for Informix DBAs including why Not to use RAID5.


This is a replay of Art Kagel's Webcast on October 20, 2015 on Informix Storage and the impact of RAID levels, why not to use RAID 5 and what RAID levels work best with modern databases.


Art Kagel, is an Independent consultant and IIUG Board Member, presented on programming, concurrency, and tuning applications against Informix. This is an update to the presentation Art did at our last Washington Area Informix User Group Meeting. (Note: there are a few problems with the sound, I tried to fix it as best as I could)


This Webcast will demo and benchmark the Informix Warehouse Accelerator 12.10. Last year we showed it running 9 hours of queries in 14 minutes. Mike Walker will demonstrate our current benchmarks with this exciting new database technology. He will demonstrate ad-hoc queries on a bookstore database with 250 million customers and over a billion records in the fact table.


This is a replay of our Fastest Informix DBA Contest 2013 status update Webcast on August 20, 2013. This year the Fastest Informix DBA Contest will be held over the web so anyone, anywhere in the world can participate from July 9 to 31, 2013. The challenge will be a combination of OLTP and batch. The winner will be the DBA who can get the most transactions per minute in an OLTP benchmark and at the same time run a batch billing job and generate the most bills in a 10 minute run. For more information on the Fastest Informix DBA Contest click here!


Informix 4GL Programming Tips

First published in the Washington Area Informix User Group Newsletter Volume 4, No. 3 – July 1994 1. Only select columns that you really need When you select data, it goes from disk to memory.  Ten un-needed bytes of data from 10,00 rows translates into reading 100,000 bytes unnecessarily.  Avoid “SELECT *” statements and only […]